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A Unicorn with a Soul: Zipline’s Unbelievable Comeback Accelerates with a new $190m Round

The unicorn club tends to be filled with four types of companies.

Bros breaking laws, yelling “DUDE!”, and improbably getting so much cash having proven so little, that failure is almost a challenge for them.

Women who have busted their ass for years, finally painstakingly proven their businesses, and are belatedly getting a pile-on of cash.

Asian companies with jaw-dropping numbers, markets and local cash.

Boring old SAAS companies that have the metrics to actually support the valuation.

Zipline, which just announced a $190 million round of funding at a $1.2 billion valuation, fits in none of those categories…

A Unicorn with a Soul: Zipline’s Unbelievable Comeback Accelerates with a new $190m Round

The unicorn club tends to be filled with four types of companies.

Bros breaking laws, yelling “DUDE!”, and improbably getting so much cash having proven so little, that failure is almost a challenge for them.

Women who have busted their ass for years, finally painstakingly proven their businesses, and are belatedly getting a pile-on of cash.

Asian companies with jaw-dropping numbers, markets and local cash.

Boring old SAAS companies that have the metrics to actually support the valuation.

Zipline, which just announced a $190 million round of funding at a $1.2 billion valuation, fits in none of those categories…

Who is REALLY responsible for Uber’s failed IPO? Uber.

By Uber’s own standards, its IPO — valuing it at some $82.4 billion at the time it started trading — was already an abject failure. And then two days of heavy selling ensued.

The debate in the financial press today is who is responsible for setting “an incorrect IPO price”  for the highest priced private deal in Silicon Valley history.

Here’s a novel hot take: Uber is. And like most things in Uber’s history, it was entirely self-inflicted and entirely unnecessary…

Who is REALLY responsible for Uber’s failed IPO? Uber.

By Uber’s own standards, its IPO — valuing it at some $82.4 billion at the time it started trading — was already an abject failure. And then two days of heavy selling ensued.

The debate in the financial press today is who is responsible for setting “an incorrect IPO price”  for the highest priced private deal in Silicon Valley history.

Here’s a novel hot take: Uber is. And like most things in Uber’s history, it was entirely self-inflicted and entirely unnecessary…

“I am very much looking forward to having a boss”: After 20 years, Gregg Spiridellis finally has his big exit

“I can’t believe I’m finally here.”

Gregg Spiridellis is talking about the six months of negotiating with Netflix over the acquisition of StoryBots, one of just a handful of deals in the gigantic company’s history. But he could have just as well have meant a lot of things by that statement.

He could have meant that he’s finally gotten his kids fed and to bed and can get on the call he promised me a few hours ago to talk about this deal.

He could have been referring to his two-year back-and-forth that recently led to the sale of the profitable but not-a-rocketship startup JibJab announced three months ago. read more

La inversión de Florentino apunta a los 600 millones

Florentino Pérez, presidente del Real Madrid, está dispuesto a tirar la casa por la ventana el próximo verano para afrontar una amplia remodelación de la plantilla. El club madridista está obligado a dar un paso adelante después de la nefasta temporada que está a punto de cerrar y por eso su presidente está preparado para sacar el talonario después de varias campañas en las que apenas ha invertido en unos cuantos jóvenes valores.

De momento, Florentino Pérez ya se ha gastado 95 millones de euros en los fichajes de los brasileños Rodrygo (45 millones) y Militao (50 millones). Y la previsión es que acabe invirtiendo un total de 600 millones en los refuerzos que ha pedido el técnico blanco, Zinedine Zidane. read more

Lecciones de éxito para los empresarios por Amancio Ortega, fundador de Zara

1. las personas introvertidas pueden prosperar como empresarios
La mayoría de los empresarios están abiertos a la gente, pero no es necesario para tener éxito. Muchos grandes empresarios son introvertidos y Amancio Ortega es una de ellas. Poco se sabe sobre conglomerados de retail, porque hace un gran esfuerzo para evitar hablar con la prensa. Una vez dijo:: “Tienes que salir tres veces al día: Cuando naciste, Cuando uno se casa y cuando se muere “. No se desanime si no tiene vacaciones vida, porque todavía se puede ejecutar un negocio rentable.
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The Assholistocracy


The reaction to the Christchurch attack, at least here in the US, has been a mix of shock and horror but not very much surprise. We’ve been watching this trend build for years: The ugly, disingenuous rhetoric of politicians, taken seriously by zealots and the mentally ill. The excuses that right wing lawmakers and commentators use when challenged on their own words: I was only kidding! It was satire! Free speech! The Christchurch attack is as horrifying as it was inevitable – the moment when online griefing mutated into real world genocide.

This is what happens to the world when assholes are in charge; when assholes allow other assholes to broadcast their bigotry with impunity, and nobody wants to stop them lest even more assholes get even more angry.

This is what happens when the President of the United States dog whistles to Breitbart that his supporters in the military and police and biker gangs like to “play tough,” or when Silicon Valley libertarians start believing that bigotry is somehow a pre-requisite for innovation…

We shouldn’t be skeptical or amused at Zuckerberg’s “pivot to privacy” memo. We should be disgusted


The media reaction to Mark Zuckerberg’s memo on privacy and Facebook has mostly fallen into two camps: skepticism and open mockery.

Mockery of the notion that, as TechCrunch put it, Zuckerberg has suddenly “discovered privacy.” Skepticism as typified by Mashable’s helpful warning that “if the last 15 years of Facebook have taught us anything, it’s that we shouldn’t take Zuckerberg’s words at face value” and the Washington Post’s adorably credulous claim that “should [Zuckerberg’s] ambition be realized, it is nothing less than an epochal shift in Facebook’s business model.”

Even Zuckerberg himself acknowledged how hard it is to believe that Facebook really cares about creating a space where users can communicate privately and in small numbers.

“I understand that many people don’t think Facebook can or would even want to build this kind of privacy-focused platform — because frankly we don’t currently have a strong reputation for building privacy protective services…”

I mean, we killed democracy, gave a platform to Nazis, sold your data to the highest bidder so… kinda hard to believe a single word we say, right?

Ho ho ho!

No…

Are toxic masculinity deniers the new climate change deniers?


Over the last few months the data has begun to stack up: Toxic masculinity is not only harmful for companies and industries, it’s not only harmful for women…it’s harmful for men too.

The APA recently issued new guidelines for treating boys and men that outlined how awful the state of male mental health is. Yes, especially among white male, straight, cisgendered and privileged men…